FLINT HILLS FIELD TRIP: ABOVE GROUND ARCHAEOLOGY

IMG_3856On April 4, Lost Kansas Communities class explored the rocky pastures of northern Wabaunsee County. They were working with a portion of a township survey from 1880, learning about the terrain and how surveyors represented it, where early property boundaries lay, sites of old springs, orchards, and homesteads. This information will allow students to analyze settler persistence rates.

A useful term for this kind of investigation is ABOVE GROUND ARCHAEOLOGY.

 

 

Here, Lost Communities student Natalie Hilburn, senior in art, stands inside old Bean School, checking out the limestone construction. Visible in this photo is the inside of the wall surrounding a window.

Here, Lost Communities student Natalie Hilburn, senior in art, stands inside old Bean School, checking out the limestone construction. Visible in this photo is the inside of the wall surrounding a window.

The smaller pieces of stone used between the larger blocks have an origin in early English stonewall construction and are called “hearting.” The builders of Bean School were German stonemasons who also understood how to use hearting to stabilize a stone wall.

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