Across the Globe: Kansas to Switzerland

  CCRS Intern McKenzie Combes, graduating in May with a dual major in history and parks and rec (historical interpretation focus), visited Onaga Historical Society recently. She worked with Debbie Berges (in sunglasses) and Linda Tessendorf  to track information about an early women’s baseball team, the Onaga Bloomer Girls. Debbie and Linda contacted a historical society member now living in Switzerland!  He was able to send McKenzie some additional information about the baseball venue in Onaga — the stock fair grounds.

McKenzie Combes

Chapman Center intern, McKenzie Combes, with Onaga Historical Society President, Linda Tessendorf, and member, Debbie Berges

    McKenzie’s project this spring is on the interesting diversity in rural Kansas baseball teams, circa WWI. She is investigating African-American players and teams as well as female teams. Her project poster, as well as three other intern posters on bootlegging, settler-railroad conflict in 1870s  southeast Kansas, and a vanished African-American town in Wabaunsee County are on display in Chapman Center. Come check out this interesting research during our Open House, Thursday, April 19, noon-4, and Friday, April 20, 11-4.

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What Goes ‘Round, Comes ‘Round: A Family Connection

Natalie Smalley and Zachary

Natalie and Zachary Smalley

Natalie Smalley and her son Zachary, from Altadena, California, visited the Chapman Center on March 12 to chat with Dr. Morgan. Natalie Smalley is the granddaughter of long-time Wabaunsee County resident Ethel Morgan. In 2010, CCRS intern Lorraine Reimers researched and wrote a study of Ethel Morgan, known as an important historian of African-American families and their experiences in this area. Ethel was also an expert quilter, honored in a 1985 Manhattan Mercury article by Mike Dorcey, “Quilting Stitches Ethel’s Life Together.” She also was the subject of several Wamego Times articles.

Lorraine Reimers’ work was one of the first CCRS projects on local and regional African-American history, a focus of the Center’s student research since the first internships were awarded back in 2009.

EthelMorgan

Find Lorraine’s bio-essay, “Ethel Mae Morgan:  An African-AmericanBiography, Wabaunsee County, Kansas, 1898-1989,” posted to the K-REX digital scholarship collection in Hale Library. Natalie Smalley and her son were familiar with Lorraine’s essay and wanted to visit the Center as a result.  In the fall of 2018, Zachary, great-grandson of Ethel Morgan, will become a student here at K-State.

 

Bidding Farewell to Familiar Faces

It is with mixed feelings that the Chapman Center family prepares to say congratulations and farewell to the Center’s December 2017 graduates. Taj Brimmer and Bradley Galka will receive their degrees during this week’s commencement ceremonies, December 8th and 9th, 2017.

Taj Grad Pic

Taj Brimmer, a senior in Public Relations with a minor in Leadership Studies, has been with the Chapman Center for three years. As a student office assistant, she served as a social media specialist in promoting the Chapman Center and its important work to KSU and the community. Brimmer also contributed to several of the Center’s signature projects, including the Going Home Exhibit that garnered national recognition.

Taj’s leadership and commitment to excellence extends beyond her work with the Chapman Center. She has been a leadership force on KSU’s campus as President of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and VP of the Black Student Union. She has received several awards including the 2017 Dean of Students Most Outstanding Senior Award. We are so proud of her and wish her the best on her postgraduate endeavors.

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Bradley Galka will receive his Master of Arts degree in History (his thesis “A Business Plot in the American Press” is a scintillating read). Brad has been a staple of the Center since joining the team in spring 2016. He is the Assistant Editor for The Online Journal of Rural Research & Policy as well as a Graduate Teaching Assistant for the Department of History.

Brad has accomplished a lot during his time at the Chapman Center. Recently, he contributed his research and writing skills to a World War II memorial commemorating the service and the lives of Riley County veterans. He was also an indispensable member of the Going Home Exhibit team.

Check out his Graduate Spotlight piece in the Archives: https://enewsletters.k-state.edu/history/2017/09/26/graduate-spotlight-brad-galka/

INTRODUCING: Chapman Center for Rural Studies Interns

We are beyond proud to introduce our 2017 – 2018 interns! Below you will find a little more information about these amazing and hardworking students:

CCRS.DarrenIvey   Darren L. Ivey

Obviously, I’m older than the average intern. After a lackluster first attempt at college, I went on to work in the food industry, construction, factory work, and professional firefighting. I returned to college four years ago, and plan to graduate next year (I don’t recommend the 30-year college plan, by the way). My wife and I celebrated our 26th wedding anniversary earlier this year. We have three sons, two of whom have left the nest. The oldest is married, but there are no grandkids yet. In the field of history, I have written two non-fiction books, the second of which will be published in October. I’m also preparing articles for submission to Great Plains Quarterly, Montana: The Magazine of Western History, and Kansas History. In addition, I publish a “Historical Artwork of the Week” post every Sunday morning on my Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/DarrenL.IveyOfficial/) that discusses a specific painting and the history behind it. I have ideas for 25 more books and three articles, all concerning nineteenth-century American history (Civil War, Texas Rangers, the Indian Wars, and lawmen of the Old West). My future career goal is to find employment as an archivist at a historical archive, hopefully somewhere here in the Midwest. This coming semester, my project will be a study of the civilian scouts employed by the U.S. Army in the Plains states in the 1860s and 1870s.

 

IMG_9890  Molly Black 

My name is Molly Black and I am a sophomore in History at Kansas State University. I was born in Lafayette, Indiana, but have lived in McPherson, Kansas for the past 11 years. I am an avid music listener, adventurer, and lover of the arts. My entire life I have been fascinated with stories: theatre, books, movies, etc. When it boils down to it, my love for history stems from my love for both stories and people. In the future, I would love to work in Public History. My dream at the moment is to work in a history museum in a large city. At K-State I am involved in the orchestra playing my violin, as well as taking private lessons. In addition, I am a part of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority and am involved in the Ichthus campus ministry.

 

pastedImage.png  Macy Davis

My name is Macy Davis and I am a junior majoring in English with a concentration in creative writing and a minor in mass communications and journalism. I’m currently serving as President of Alpha of Clovia 4-H Cooperative Leadership house, and I compete on the K-state forensics team. As a book lover, it should come as no surprise that my favorite hobbies are reading and writing, plus I spent this past summer as an intern at the Young Readers Center in the Library of Congress. As a western Kansas native (I’m from Scott City), I have an affinity for windswept prairie and sunsets over farm fields. I look forward to writing about western Kansas this semester as I work on a research project about sense of place, potentially through the angle of the moving window.

FullSizeRender (9)   Morgan Fluker 

My name is Morgan Fluker, and I am from Valley Center, Kansas.  I am a senior in Anthropology this year with a focus in Cultural Anthropology and Ethnohistory. I enjoy spending time with my family, reading, writing, and going on road trips, especially to museums and festivals.  My project for the Chapman Center will be focused around the Kanza Indian tribe and their use of natural resources in and around waterways in Kansas. The project will be to produce an original map of the known resources and trails. After graduation in May, I hope to continue my education in graduate school focusing on Cultural Anthropology or Museum and Heritage Studies.

 

Free Going Home Workshops Offered in December

cedar-point-chase_county_1901_platmap_photos_111_cchs_053116You are invited to a Free Restoring Historic Photographs Workshop this Saturday, Dec. 3, 2-4:30 pm, at the Flint Hills Discovery Center in conjunction with our “Going Home: Hidden Histories of the Flint Hills” exhibit!

You’ll explore advanced Adobe Photoshop techniques to improve digital materials (scans and digital photographs). You’ll also learn how to optimize scanning, restore original coloration, and repair small photo blemishes and irregularities. You are encouraged to bring your own photographs and Photoshop-equipped computers. You can practice a wider ranges of techniques with provided materials and technology. Computer terminals will be first come, first served. Tom Parish is the visiting instructor in Digital Humanities at the Chapman Center for Rural Studies and will lead the workshop. Spaces are limited, please preregister by calling 785-587-2726.

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Free Oral History Workshop
Saturday, December 10, 2016, 2-4 pm

Flint Hills Discovery Center

Join “Going Home” Exhibit Curator, Bonnie Lynn-Sherow, for the Free Oral History Workshop, December 10, a lively workshop where you will learn how to conduct your own oral history interviews with friends, family, and more. Lynn-Sherow, Executive Director of the Chapman Center for Rural Studies and Exhibit Curator, will offer hands-on instruction in interview technology including the StoryCorps‘ app,  She will share tips for a successful interview. No registration is required. Workshop is free and open to all ages.

As always, you are encouraged to explore the Chapman Center for Rural Studies’ “Going Home” featured exhibit at the Flint Hills Discovery Center. You have until January 8, 2017, to discover – and record your own – Hidden Histories of the Flint Hills.

Swing by the special exhibit website at http://goinghome.gallery for a preview of what you’ll find at the “Going Home: Hidden Histories of the Flint Hills” exhibit!

Welcome HistoryCats!

Durso f2 volland school860

Volland, Kansas, School, ca. 1860. Courtesy of Wabaunsee County Historical Society.

Welcome WildCats to a new year and new opportunities to Make History!

With classes in Lost Kansas Communities, Advance Seminars in History, and History of the United States to 1877 starting; our “Going Home: Hidden Histories of the Flint Hills” exhibit launching to the public September 24 at the Flint Hills Discovery Center, and interns working on Middle Kansas projects and more, the Chapman Center for Rural Studies is a busy place!

You are invited to explore our refreshed “Chapman Center Research Collections” online which houses our Lost Kansas Communities research, maps, and other thematic exhibits such as “Kansas History and Life.” Several town studies have been added this summer and there are more to come!

Keep an eye on the Rural Telegraph blog, our Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube channel for up-to-date information about your Chapman Center for Rural Studies!

And Go WildCats! Make History!

New Video Trailers: “Going Home” Exhibit, September 24, 2016 – January 8, 2017

Laura Ingalls Wilder once said, “Home is the nicest word there is.”
What if your home or hometown no longer stands?

The Chapman Center for Rural Studies will host “Going Home: Hidden Histories of the Flint Hills,” an exhibit at the Flint Hills Discovery Center, starting September 24. You are invited to explore the histories of seven Flint Hills, Kansas, towns including: Bodarc, Broughton, Cedar Point, Chalk, Maple City, Volland, and Big John Creek Village, the Kansas home of the Kaw Nation. Kids will have a very special area dedicated to exploring how Kansas kids of the past played, learned, and more!

08042016 James Pepper Henry

An interactive map of all verified towns will help you envision how the Flint Hills population waxed and waned. Vintage photos and video will be displayed throughout the exhibit where you can explore towns and ideas like communication, travel, and recreation of Kansas’ past. Several iPad stations will be posted for more exploration of the seven featured towns.

Plan to stop at the Story Store, a place to record your memories of home throughout the exhibit. This is also where we will partner with nationally-recognized, StoryCorps, in November. “StoryCorps’ mission is to preserve and share humanity’s stories in order to build connections between people and create a more just and compassionate world.” We hope to add Flint Hill stories to their archive housed in the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.

This exhibition represents the work of undergraduate students working with Chapman Center for Rural Studies faculty and made possible by an estate gift from Mr. Mark Chapman. The stories, images, sounds and exhibit films were written, discovered, and created by an amazing and talented group of young scholars who care deeply about the Flint Hills. ( View more videos on our YouTube channel!)

The exhibition opens Saturday, September 24, at 10 am to the public.

Explore hidden places of the Flint Hills and their stories! You’ll also be invited to tell us all about what ‘Going Home’ means to you. 

Visit the Chapman Center for Rural Studies on YouTube for more video trailers, student-crafted multi-media projects, and discussions of rural Kansas history.